From The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature (2006):
"Maria Barton Hack published her first book First Lessons in English Grammar, in 1812. She became one of Quaker publisher William Darton’s most important authors. Hack’s pedagogical strategy, characteristic of her era, was to incorporate facts with fiction, using a frame story, as in Winter Evenings (1818), where a mother tells travellers’ tales to spark her children’s interest in geography. Hack’s history books, such as Grecian Stories (1819), brought out moral lessons reflected in the lives of the great. Her most famous work Harry Beaufoy; or the Pupil of Nature (1821), attempted to inspire awareness of God through a fictional boy’s observations of the natural world. Harry’s parents point out the workings of a beehive, hoping he will deduce the presence of God from its perfect form and functionality. Hack’s later works, like Familiar Illustrations of the Principal Evidences and Design of Christianity (1824), became more theological, as she moved away from Quakerism."


Marriage


The following record is Public Record Office reference number RG 6/543:
external image stephen%20hack%20and%20maria%20barton%201800%20SMALL.jpg

"On the Seventh Day of the Second Month, One Thousand Eight Hundred and .. Stephen Hack of Chichester in the county of Sussex, Merchant.... Son of James Hack of the same place, Merchant and Priscilla his Wife, and Mary Barton.... Daughter of John Barton, late of London, Linen draper and Mary --ii-- his Wife [both deceased], took each other in Marriage in a publick Assembly of the people called Quakers, in Tottenham, in the presence of us.

William Dillwyn
Yeoman of Walthamstow, Essex
Edw.d Janson
of London - Warehouseman
Anth.y Horne, of
Bankside, Southwark
Coal Merchant

The words, "both deceased" being first interlined

this Marriage was solemnized between us,
Stephen Hack
Mary Barton"


Portrait
external image Maria%20Hack%20nee%20Mary%20Barton%201777-1844%20from%20Iola%20Mathews.jpg
The portrait above was passed to me by Chris Durrant from Iola Mathews. Note the striking similarity in pose and dress to the portrait of her stepmother Elizabeth Horne (1760-1833).

Publications


I am indebted to Iola Mathews for the following comprehensive list:

  1. First Lessons in English Grammar (1812) by Maria Hack, published by Harvey & Darton, Gracechurch Street, London.
  2. The Little Visitors; a Reader, primary, in words composed mainly of one or two syllables (1815) by Maria Hack, republished in 1818, and recently (as POD).
  3. The Winter Scene (1818) by Maria Hack, published in London.
  4. Winter Evenings, or Tales of Travellers (1818-1824) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London in 4 volumes: 1818, 1819, vol 3, 1820, 1824. New edition with illustrations 1840, 1853. It ran to six editions in England. An American edition was published in 1851 by Appleton, Philadelphia. Also published in 1870 by Strahan and Co, 56 Ludgate Hill, London. These four volumes were republished in 1877 under new titles, (see 21 below.) The Journal of Education, April 1831, said: ‘Mrs Hack has had the happy art of condensing all that is interesting and amusing in the best narratives of voyagers and travellers.’
  5. Grecian Stories, taken from the works of eminent historians (1819) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. 2nd ed 1824. There was also an 1821 edition adapted for the use of schools.
  6. English stories, first series, illustrating events and characters between the accession of Alfred and the death of John (1820) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. Republished 1839 etc. Also revised edition 1872.
  7. English stories, second series, between the accession of Henry the Third and the death of Henry the Sixth (1820) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London.
  8. Harry Beaufoy; or the Pupil of Nature (1821) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. 2nd ed 1824. 3rd edition 1830. Also published in 2010 in POD format. The Journal of Education, April 1831, said of Harry Beaufoy, ‘In this little volume the mechanism of the human frame is explained so simply and so clearly, that children of ten years old can fully understand and take an interest...’
  9. Familiar Illustrations of the Principal Evidences and Design of Christianity (1824) by Maria Hack. Published in London.
  10. English stories, third series, Reformation under the Tudor princes (1825) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. The Journal of Education, April 1831, said, ‘These volumes impart correct historical knowledge, and at the same time convey beautiful lessons of morality, the highest and best use of history.’
  11. Oriental fragments (1828) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. The preface says this book attempts to make the Scriptures more interesting to children, by illustrating the customs, manners and natural history of Eastern countries from passages in the writing of travellers to the East and from ‘Jewish, Heathen and Mahammedan authors.’
  12. Geological sketches and glimpses of the ancient Earth (1832) by Maria Hack. Published by Harvey & Darton, London. Republished 1839.
  13. Lectures at home (1834) by Maria Hack. Published by Darton & Harvey, London. Dedicated to her daughter Mary and her companions.
  14. The Christian Ordinances of Baptism and the Lord’s Supper not Typical Rites (1837) by Maria Hack. Published in London.
  15. Stories of animals, first series, for children 5-7 years (1822; 2nd edition) by Maria Hack. 5th edition 1887. Also in 2009 in POD format.
  16. A second series of stories of animals, for children 7-10 years (1831) by Maria Hack.
  17. The child’s atlas... with a book of definitions and questions (<1828) by Maria Hack. The Journal of Education, 1831 said: ‘In the Child’s Atlas, its companion, geography is clearly and simply explained, and they are in almost every respect what elementary books should be.’
  18. A geographical panorama...with a book of directions (<1828) by Maria Hack. Described by the publisher as ‘Representations of the Scenery and Inhabitants of various Regions...With a Book of Explanation. The whole contained in a neat Mahogany Box.’
  19. Tales of distant lands (<1834) by Maria Hack.
  20. The Earth and all its inhabitants; geography for children (1854) by Margaret Darton. Was begun by Maria Hack and completed after her death by her daughter. Revised edition published by Routledge & Sons, NY, 1868.
  21. Long after Maria’s death in 1844, her ‘Winter evenings or tales of travellers’ in four vols (see 3 above) were republished under new titles, as follows:
  • Travels in hot and cold lands (1877) by Maria Hack. Published by Daldy, Isbister & Co, London.
  • Adventures by land and sea (1877) by Maria Hack. Published by Daldy, Isbister & Co, London. Also by Routledge & Sons, London, 1879.
  • In land and ice deserts (1877) by Maria Hack.