It is something of a family tradition that my Barton ancestors lived in a house now called Ive Bank in Ivegill, and this has been asserted in print as well:

"Thy cordial approval of my brother John's hearty wish to bring us back to the simple habits of the olden time induces me to ask thee if I mentioned in either of my late letters the curious old papers he stumbled on in hunting through the repositories of our late excellent spinster sister? I quite forget whether I did or not; so I will not at a venture repeat all the items. But he found an inventory of the goods and chattels of our great-grandfather, John Barton of Ive-Gill, a little hamlet about five or seven miles from Carlisle; by which it seems our progenitor was one of those truly patriarchal personages, a Cumbrian statesman — living on his own little estate, and drawing from it all things needful for himself and his family.
...
Why did his son, my grandfather, after whom I was named, ever leave that pleasant dale, and go and set up a manufactory in Carlisle; inventing a piece of machinery for which he had a medal from the Royal Society? — so says Pennant. Methinks he had better have abode in the old grey stone, slate-covered homestead on the banks of that pretty brooklet the Ive! but I bear his name, so I will not quarrel with his memory." Letter by Bernard Barton the Quaker poet (1784-1849), quoted in *Fitzgerald 1849 and also *Barton 1850.

"I have not had time thoroughly to explore the Bishop's High Head tithing. Here Barton Field reminds us of the family of that name so long residing in Ivegill, of the John Barton who seems to have given a bell to the ancient chapel of Highhead, and of the Quaker poet Bernard Barton. Their small house still stands opposite to the larger and more important one of the old and remarkable Quaker family of Bewley, near to the peaceful green terrace which is the site of the Quaker burial ground, and above the graceful, one-arched, pack-horse bridge in Ivegill parish." *Transactions CWAAS v10 1889 p267


In the unpublished 1889 memoir of Rev. John Barton of Cambridge (1836-1908) he mentions the house twice:

"Though my father spent so many years of his life in the south of England, he was really a north countryman by descent, his father having been the first to migrate southwards and the little hamlet of Ivegill, 6 miles south of Carlisle still contains the house in which probably seven or eight generations of our ancestors lived and which still bears on its porch the letter JB:JB:1694 carved on the massive stone lintel. The registers of the adjoining parish of Dalston, of which indeed Ivegill was formerly an outlying hamlet, show that these initials referred in all probability to the names of John Barton and Jane Barton. The same registers contain the names of many other Bartons extending as far back as 1564; and so far as can be gathered from these records the Bartons of Ivegill appear to have been of the class of Cumbrian yeomen or “statesmen” as they were then and are still so called, a statesman being one who own and farms his own land as distinguished from one who merely occupies as a tenant the lands for another. There are still as many as 96 of those small holdings, as the present vicar the Rev. R. Phillips, informs me in this one parish of Ivegill, though many of them have now passed into the hands of larger proprietors. Tradition further relates that many of the Bartons were Quakers and a field is still pointed out immediately behind the house in which they lived, as having been the Quaker burial ground. A small chapel in the dale close to High Head Castle also bears on its eastern face a tablet with an inscription of the date of 1682, containing the names of 13 of the principal landowners or parishioners when the chapel was doubtless either built or enlarged. The last two names in this list are those of Bernard Barton and John Barton."

Certain details here are at variance with the published *Dalston parish records: the earliest records of Bartons there date to 1573 not 1564, and there is no record of a couple called John and Jane Barton. However, later in his memoir John seems less certain about the John and Jane hypothesis:

"We also went to see the house in which our Barton forefathers lived and in which there is to be seen to this day a stone chimney-piece bearing the following inscription IB:IB:1694. IB here stands no doubt for the John Barton of the chapel tablet but who his bride may have been I know not. A further search among the Dalston registers would no doubt throw light on the subject."


Inscription


Ive Bank inscription in Ivegill.JPG

Certainly above the door at Ive Bank there is an inscription matching the one described twice above, although it is over an external door not on a stone chimney-piece (unless there are two, or one which was later moved). It reads "IB:IB U 1694" (see above). It could perhaps stand for John Barton (d.1720) and Isabell Barton his wife. However at the moment there is scant solid evidence to corroborate the view that Bartons lived in this particular house. It could be a mistake made by earlier family historians.





Deeds, Indentures & Manorial Documents


The current owners of Ive Bank have in their possession a number of ancient deeds to the house, the earliest of which is an indenture dated 1842 between a William Barton Monkhouse and a Thomas Lancaster.

There are also two manorial documents, found amongst the *ABH research notes, which relate to Ivegill and possibly to Ive Bank. The first is believed to describe the handing over of the property rights from the recently deceased John Barton of Ivegill (d.1747) to his son Bernard Barton of Carlisle (1728-1773):

Richmond 1747 (Bernard Barton Ivegill property) .jpg

"9 Dec. 1747

Manor of Highhed.

On the Ninth day of December in this Year of Our Lord One Thousand, Seven Hundred & Forty Seven Came Bernard Barton, upon the Death of John Barton, Father of ye sd. Bernard Barton, & took of me Susannah Richmond Lady of the said Mannor, a Messuage & Tenemt. wth. the appurtenances lying at Ivegill wth.in, & parcell of the said Manor, of the Yearly Arbitrary Customary Rent of Eight Shillings & Sixpence, & other Services, To Hold the said Messuages & Tenemt. wth. the appurtenances unto the said Bernard Barton during the Joint Lives of me the said Lady & the said Bernard Barton at the will of the Lady according to the Custom of the said Manor. Yielding & Paying therefore the sd. Yearly Rent of Eight Shillings & Sixpence at the days & times due & of right accustom'd. And doing, paying, & performing, all other Dues, Duties, Customs & Service, due for & in respect of the Same & the said Bernard Barton having compounded for & paid the Sum of Five Pounds & Nineteen Shillings as the Descent Fine, is thereupon admitted Tenant by me,

Sus. Richmond.

Rent
L S D
0:8:6

Admittance
0:2:6
Enrolling
0-1-0

Fine
£5-19-0

A Godspenny"


The second document, of which only a transcript is in my possession, then repeats the process for Bernard's son, John Barton the Elder (1754-1789) (his father Bernard having died on 6 Jan 1773):

"1 Jan 1774

Manor of Highead.

Be it remembered on the first Day of January in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Four came John Barton Son and Heir of Bernard Barton deceased and took of me Susannah Richmond Lady of the said Manor a Messuage and Teniment with the Appurtenances lying and being at Ivegill within and parcel of said Manor a Messuage and Teniment of the Yearly customary Rent of Eight Shillings and Sixpence and other Services to Hold the said Messuage and Tenim.t with the appurtenances unto the said John Barton at the Will of the Lady According to the Customs of the sd. Manor. Yeilding and paying therefore the said yearly rent of Eight Shillings and Sixpence at the Days and Times due and of right accustomed and doing paying and for the same And the said John Barton havign Compounded and paid the Sum of Six pounds Six Shillings for & as a Desent Fee is therefore admitted Tenant.

By Me

her
Sus R Richmond"
mark

Rent
L S D
0:8:6

Admittance
0:2:6
Enrolling
0-1-0

Fine
L S D
6:6:6
A Godspenny"

The Lanty Trough


Ive Bank outhouse with trough for ammonia.JPG

In the garden is a very old outhouse (above) which incorporates in the side wall on the right a 'lanty trough' (named after 'lant') used for aging urine which could then be used for cleaning and bleaching. The inventor Bernard Barton of Carlisle (1728-1773) was in the bleaching business. He was born in Ivegill (at least according to his gravestone, although this detail was a later addition to a replacement headstone), but his mother Ann (d.1748) left him property not in Ivegill but in Thomas Close, a few miles to the south (where there is still a farm called Bartons Farm). There is no mention of Ive Bank in her will nor in that of her husband John Barton of Ivegill (d.1747), who would in any case have been only a small child in 1694 when the inscription is dated.

However the father of that John Barton was also called John Barton (d.1720) and married an Isabell Barton. They were a young family in 1694 and this seems like a good explanation for the inscription. Unfortunately, in his will, this John Barton doesn't mention Ive Bank, instead referring to property called 'Parcy Close' or 'Parce Close' (which he left to his elder son William, brother of John Barton d.1747).