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LEFT: A miniature portrait of young Emily, forming a matching pair with one of her husband. Image courtesy of Charles Baron.
RIGHT: Photograph from the *NJB family archive.


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Mentions


"It must have been in 1830 that my Father met my sweet Mother (Emily Dougan), of whom I love to say that 'I owe her all I am and have' — (for she always prayed for her daughters' husbands and her sons' wives from the time they were 17).

They met in a romantic way – for being caught in a summer shower in Torquay he suddenly bethought him he must be near the home of the sisters of a young officer he had known in India, and promised to call on. He said to himself 'there will I take shelter, and pay off my visit at the same time'. No sooner said than done - and he found himself in the middle of what must have been a very charming family of sisters, of rare accomplishments and good looks, and seems to have been in no hurry to leave Torquay. Their name was Dougan, a good Irish family, descended from the O'Neils. But we know but little of our dear Mother's family – for both her parents died before she became our father's wife; and as his jealously absorbing love induced him to separate her one by one from all her family, it came to pass that we never saw but one of them - whom you elder boys may possibly remember in Strathmore Gardens in 1876, your Great Uncle John Dougan: a handsome gentle old man, with marked features very like our little Guy Douglas. He had been in the Army. What I do know of my Grandfather Dougan is that he owned large sugar plantations in Jamaica and did such good service, first on his own property and then for the Government in inducing plantation owners to free their slaves, that he was received with honors as he sailed up the Thames - the shipping being decked with flags etc. But he lived only a short time to enjoy his honors, and his pension dying with him, his family were left indifferently off.


My Grandmother Dougan was known in Devon as one of the 3 beautiful Miss Squires; her Christian name was Clarissa. (On 2 separate papers given me by my cousin Sir Claude Macdonald - great nephew of my Mother's - you will find full particulars of the Dougan family). When therefore my Father returned to his Father's house, 47 Portland Place, London, to tell him he had won the heart of the lovely and accomplished Emily Dougan but who nevertheless had no fortune, my Grandfather who was a proud and ambitious man, and had other plans for his son, was little pleased. He sent him to stay with Lord Delaware, and Sir Theophilus Lee and many great people where he hoped he might take a fancy to someone else - but my father's mind was made up, and nothing would move him; and as he soon got his Mother on his side, my Grandfather had to yield, and said 'Go fetch your Emily, and let us judge of her ourselves.'

My gentle mother has often described how she dreaded the ordeal of being introduced to my formidable Grandfather, who was not welcoming her as a daughter in law. She was now staying in London with her Guardian, Sir James Stephen, Colonial Secretary - and on a certain day they were all invited to a large dinner party at Portland Place. Great was my dear Grandmother's loving wish that her future daughter in law should please her Sire! And having already made her acquaintance at her Guardian's, she managed to waylay the timid girl ere she entered the Drawing Room, and encouraged her to fear nothing. I can picture her as I have heard her describe that night, as my dear kind Grandmother took her by the hand, and led her into the large gathering, where were many criticizing eyes. Dressed in white India muslin, with her glorious black hair done in coils upon coils on the top of her head, with strings of pearls twisted in amongst them - her only ornament - her lovely pink and white complexion, which she kept to the day of her death, her perfect features, and deep set, dark, loving hazel eyes, my Grandmother rightly thought she would soften the heart of stone, & in her own merits, break down the strongest prejudice. And she was not far wrong; for after holding her at arms length for a few seconds, my Grandfather stooped down and kissed her forehead; and the ice was broken, and the thaw set in. She had not easy work with him though for many years; but her imperturbably sweet temper, and almost too perfect conduct as a wife, at last won him completely - and he was known to say 'Was there ever such a perfect woman as Emily’! And during his latter years nothing was too good for her - and after his dear wife's death she was more and more to him - drawing his now softened and humble heart to believe in God's love to him ..... But I have forestalled.

Shortly after the aforesaid introduction to her husband's family, my dear mother was married to my Father in Holy Trinity Church, Marylebone, by the Rev. Charles Simeon, of Trinity Church Cambridge, her guardian, Sir James Stephen, giving her away." *Memoirs of Emily Elliott pp6-8


Sketchbook


Emily travelled widely with her husband and one of her sketchbooks survives. One sample image is below, the rest are reproduced on this page; I (DBHB) have had fun trying to identify the subjects of the sketches and matching them to modern photographs where possible.

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Memorials


At St. Mary's Church, Tattingstone:
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Image courtesy of Charles Sale, www.gravestonephotos.com.

In this Vault repose the mortal remains of ALICIA the beloved wife of CHARLES ELLIOTT, ???? of Portland Place, London, who departed this Life on the 5th July, 1851, Aged 71 Years.
Also of the said CHARLES ELLIOTT, ???? who died on the 4th May, 1856, Aged 79 Years.
Also of WILLIAM HENRY ELLIOTT, ESQUIRE of H.M. Bengal Civil Service, Second Son of the said CHARLES ELLIOTT ESQUIRE who died on the 8th October 1870, Aged 59 Years.
Also of the Rev. CHARLES BOILEAU ELLIOTT, Eldest Son of the said CHARLES ELLIOTT ESQUIRE who died on the 1st July 1875, Aged 72 Years.
Also of EMILY GERTRUDE, his wife, who fell asleep on the 3rd January 1877, Aged 70 Years.

Also at St. Mary's Church, Tattingstone:
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Image courtesy of Charles Sale, www.gravestonephotos.com.

Sacred TO THE MEMORY OF THE REV. CHARLES BOILEAU ELLIOTT, FORMERLY OF THE BENGAL CIVIL SERVICE, M.A. F.R.S. AND FOR 38 YEARS RECTOR OF THIS PARISH.
BORN AT CALCUTTA, FEBY 16TH 1803, DIED AT GENEVA, JULY 1ST 1875.
ALSO OF EMILY GERTRUDE, HIS WIFE, DAUGHTER OF JOHN DOUGAN, ESQUIRE, BORN JANUARY 28TH 1806, WHO AFTER YEARS OF PATIENT SUFFERING ENTERED INTO REST, JANY 3RD 1877.
"THESE ARE THEY WHICH CAME OUT OF GREAT TRIBULATION,
AND HAVE WASHED THEIR ROBES, AND MADE THEM WHITE
IN THE BLOOD OF THE LAMB.
THEREFORE ARE THEY BEFORE THE THRONE OF GOD." REV. VII 14,15


Children


With Rev. Charles Boileau Elliott (1803-1875):
  1. Alicia Elliott (1832-1912).
  2. Charles Pearson Elliott (1833-1876).
  3. Harry Verney Wingfield Elliott (1834-1835).
  4. William Henry Elliott (1837-1844).
  5. Emily Elliott (1839-1924).
  6. Arthur Wilmot Elliott (1841-1862).
  7. Isabel Maria Elliott (1842-1870).
  8. Mary Elliott (b.1844).